Help your Doctor Assess your Asthma Control

Most people who suffer from asthma know that whilst the condition is under control most of the time. Asthma attack’s can come on  at any time. You should see your doctor at least every 6 months your doctor might ask whether or not you’ve experienced an asthma attack since the last visit, or a change in the symptoms or peak flow measurements. They can also ask about your daily activities.

This information will help your doctor assess your asthma control.

Your doctor may require you to use your peak flow meter every day and keep track of your results. It may be useful to record peak flow for a few weeks before each medical visit and take them with you.

Taking care of yourself every day is an important part of managing your asthma control. Try to eat a balanced diet, exercise and reduce stress in your life. Healthy habits will improve your ability to manage your asthma.

If your child has asthma, all those who care about him or her to know about the action plan of your child.Staff including nannies and  schools. These doctors can help their children to follow action plan. Your doctor may need to increase treatment if asthma not keep it under control. On the other hand, if asthma well controlled for several months, your doctor may reduce your medication.

Adjustments to your medicine will help maintain the best possible control of the lesser quantity necessary medication.
Your doctor may ask if you have any difficulties or problems you have taking your drugs or keep your asthma
action plan. Based on your answers to these questions, your doctor may change the dose of your medicine.

Comments

  1. For convenience, asthma action plans are often broken down into three zones on your peak flow meter: green, yellow, and red. In each zone, your asthma action plan will give you doctor-written instructions on how to handle each circumstance.

  2. Your action plan is based on zones of asthma severity defined by symptoms and your personal best peak expiratory flow (PEF) , which is your highest peak flow recorded over a 2- to 3-week period when your asthma is under control. Personal best is never measured during an asthma attack. If you do not know your personal best, talk to your doctor.

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